World War II Vet Joe Hoberman

Heart of the Matter 6.23.17:

Working Together in DC- WWII Stories.

 

Joe Hoberman was 18 years old when he enlisted to serve in WWII. Sent to the European Theater, Joe landed in Normandy as a replacement.

 

Listen down below!

His section starts at 32:59.

“The Americhicks - Molly and Kim” is a radio show airing on KDMT 1690 AM, Monday - Friday 5-6pm. Podcasts of past shows can be heard via the Radio Archives page or by clicking the iTunes button below.

World War II Nurse - Leila Morrison

Leila Morrison, a nurse during World War II still has raw memories and emotions after more than 70 years. Catch Denver7's Dayle Cedars' interview, here.

World War II Project

Albert Engle was born in Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania on November 22, 1922 and grew up with 4 brothers and 2 sisters.

 

Albert worked in his grandparents’ farm and was still a young boy when he found a job in a mine at the age of 18. It was a rough work but there were no other employment offer at that time. After 7 months, Al finally quit the coal mine and went to work in a rail road company where he was paid 45 cent per hour.

 

In 1941, the young boy married a charming girl he had met when he was still in school. Two of his brothers were already in the army, and when the Empire of Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December of the same year, more and more young Americans entered in the United States Armed Forces. Even though he already had a young boy, Albert was called to serve his country in March 1943, and soon started his training at Fort Leonard, Missouri to become an infantry soldier. After a year of training, his outfit left New York towards Europe.

 

When he arrived in England, Albert and his buddy Kemer wanted to leave the infantry to join the paratroopers or the army rangers, they finally volunteered for the Rangers after playing heads or tails with a nickle. An officer asked many questions because he wanted to be sure that the 2 young men would have the mental and the physical fortitude to become a Ranger. It was a tough unit and they only wanted the best to fight with the Rangers who were highly trained with a very high esprit de corps. After proved themselves, they started a specific and difficult training enabling them to infiltrate deep behind enemy lines on foot. A few days after the invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, Albert finally ended up with E Company, 2nd Ranger Battalion because of the heavy casualties the company had suffered on Pointe-du-Hoc. Indeed, after two days of fighting, only 90 of the original 225 Rangers who had led the assault on Pointe-du-Hoc were still able to man their positions when American troops from Omaha Beach finally broke through from the east to relieve them.

 

After crossing the fields and hedgerows of Normandy, Albert participated in a fierce battle when the 2nd Ranger Battalion entered into Brest, Brittany to capture the port facilities. After the Brest campaign the next major operation would not be until the fighting in the Hurtgen Forest in late 1944. During that bloody battle, Albert was able to reconnect with his brother Charles D. Engle who was fighting next to him with the 311th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division. They later moved in different directions with their respective units. Unfortunately, Albert’s brother was killed in action on March 9, 1944 while his company was fighting near the bridge of Remagen.

 

When he learnt about the death of his brother, Albert was devastated and said he would never take any more prisoners. Even though the loss of his brother was painful, Albert took more prisoners until the end of war because he knew that he would have to leave with his actions and decisions for the rest of his life.

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I've recorded Barney Hovey who lost his best friend Walter Garside in July 1944. Both of them were replacement soldier and assigned to the 329th Infantry Regiment, 83rd Infantry Division but not in the same company. Barney Hovey found out in Dec 44 that his best friend had been killed 5 days after they were both assigned to their new unit. He saw for the first time the grave of his best friend in 2015 because I took a picture of the grave and sent to Barney Hovey. I put flower on the grave very often since.

 

During his training, Barney (left) met a young fellow named Walter Garside (right) and after several weeks spend together, they became really good friends. At that time they were replacement soldiers waiting to be attached to a unit who would need them.

 

On July 19 1944, the two best friends were together when they were called for their new assignment. They would both be attached to the 329th Infantry Regiment of the 83rd Infantry Division, but in a different company. Barney was then attached to L Company and Walter Garside to E company. The 83rd Infantry Division had landed in Normandy a month before and the two replacements then arrived in their new outfit during that terrible campaign.

 

Only 5 days after there new affectation, Walter Garside was killed in action by an artillery fire. He is now buried at the Cemetery of Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy (Plot: C, Row: 21, Grave 31).

Hear Lt. John Ritenour World War II Stories

Read Doug Dillard's amazing war story and resume here. Read more here.

We wish you a very Blessed New Year! Indeed, we have much to be grateful for from the Divine Provider. We recorded a very special show.  You’ll hear stories from four WWII vets:

 

  • Al Mampre was a medic with 101st Airborne (Easy Company).
  • Guy Whidden, 101st Airborne.  Jumped on D-Day
  • Frank DeVita, First wave Omaha
  • Maj. Fredric Arnold, P-38 pilot, 50 missions

 

We owe these men tremendous gratitude.  We think of all of the soldiers and their families who gave “The Last Full Measure of Devotion” and it takes our breath away!It’s one thing to read about the war in a history book. It’s life changing to hear detailed, personal stories, directly from a soldier’s mouth. Looking into their eyes as they bare their soul on the painful memories and awesome miracles they witnessed first hand is a true gift to the receiver, and we believe, the key to securing the freedom we uniquely enjoy in America.

See the images from the recent WWII Event here

 

“The Americhicks - Molly & Kim”, had the opportunity to visit Normandy with 4 WWII vets on D Day, 2016. What we realized, while we were in France, is that there is so much more to the limited stories we learned in school. The greatest generation has kept quiet for 60-70 years. We are grateful that many are sharing their stories now.  Many history books are actually distorting the truth about America’s role in many of our military wars and conflicts. We are inspired and dedicated to gathering as many stories from this greatest generation as possible, and sharing them with our kids and our communities. Hence, our WWII project, was born.

CONTRIBUTE

Normandy

In June 2016 the Denver Police Activities League invited the chicks on a trip to Normandy, France with them, some WWII Veterans, and some a few students.

 

Click here to Learn more

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Read Doug Dillard's amazing war story and resume here. Read more here.

was born in Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania on November 22, 1922 and grew up with 4 brothers and 2 sisters.

I've recorded who lost his best friend Walter Garside in July 1944. Both of them were replacement soldier and assigned to the 329th Infantry Regiment, 83rd Infantry Division but not in the same company. Barney Hovey found out in Dec 44 that his best friend had been killed 5 days after they were both assigned to their new unit. He saw for the first time the grave of his best friend in 2015 because I took a picture of the grave and sent to Barney Hovey. I put flower on the grave very often since.